How to Change Colors in Corner to Corner Crochet

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Hi Crochet Friends, this week we have a fantastic Crochet Tip from Erin Toews of Juniper & Oakes. In today’s post Erin will explain how to make tidier color changes in C2C Crochet.

Be sure to visit Erin for more great patterns and crochet tips! She has a extensive collection of video tutorials on YouTube too, so if you are a visual learner, subscribe to her channel.


Learn more about Erin Toes, the designer behind Juniper & Oakes in her Guest Post here. Included in the post are some fabulous free crochet patterns for you to try!


Hi Crochet Friends, this week we have a fantastic Crochet Tip from Erin Toews of Juniper & Oakes. In today's post Erin will explain how to make tidier color changes in C2C Crochet.

How to Make Color Changes in C2C Crochet

Working the slip stitch from behind, then working your chain covers up the little blip of color that happens with slip stitching. Using this tip allows your project to look more polished - more like the chart.

Do you struggle with changing colors in Corner-to-Corner (or C2C) crochet?

If you’ve ever worked up a C2C chart, you know that the finished product doesn’t always look exactly like the chart.

There’s something about the way the stitches are made that doesn’t correlate exactly with the pixels in the chart. I have one tip to help your project look more polished.

When finishing off the last square/tile/pixel of a certain color, come in from behind the chain space to work your final slip stitch, drop the color you were using, leaving the strand on the wrong side, grab the new color and finish off the slip stitch.

Normally if using the same color throughout, I would work the C2C stitches, then finish off with a slip stitch to the chain 3 space of the next tile, inserting the hook from the front to the back. BUT when changing to a new color, I adjust my method and slip stitch from behind.

Why?

Working the slip stitch from behind, then working your chain covers up the little blip of color that happens with slip stitching. Using this tip allows your project to look more polished – more like the chart.

I have even more tips in this video:



Quick tip – When finishing off the last square/tile/pixel of a certain color, come in from behind the chain space to work your final slip stitch, drop the color you were using, leaving the strand on the wrong side, grab the new color and finish off the slip stitch.

Erin Toews, Juniper & Oakes

There are 12 different plant-themed C2C squares seamed together to create the Plants with Yarn Blanket.

Ready to Give it a Try?

I have teamed up with some amazing crochet designers to create a C2C blanket crochetalong. There are 12 different plant-themed C2C squares seamed together to create the Plants with Yarn Blanket. The charts for each square will be released for free on the designer’s websites throughout the month of June 2023. The full pattern with charts, written instructions, and color blocks is available if you prefer to get the complete package all at once.

Learn more & join the CAL: https://juniperandoakes.com/blog/plantswithyarn-c2c-blanket-free-crochetalong


MEET ERIN

Hi! My name is Erin, the designer behind Juniper & Oakes. I like to use interesting stitches (like C2C, mosaic, etc) to create CALs & other designs for you to crochet & use around your home. I love providing patterns, resources & other yarn-related content to my crochet community! I hope you join me!

Working the slip stitch from behind, then working your chain covers up the little blip of color that happens with slip stitching. Using this tip allows your project to look more polished - more like the chart.

C2C COLOR CHANGING PRACTISE PROJECTS:

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