Half Double Crochet Cotton Hat Pattern

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Yarn categories are very diverse. When a yarn is listed as a Medium Weight Yarn (Worsted Weight) it does not necessarily mean it will produce the same crocheted result as another Yarn in the same category.  Both yarns can even have the same wraps per inch (wpi) and still crochet differently due to the density and elasticity of the yarn. I designed this Half Double Crochet Cotton Hat Pattern to be used with Cotton yarns – which have less stretch and elasticity than acrylic or natural fiber yarns. Please continue to the full written pattern below if you are looking for a free pattern to use with your medium weight cotton yarn.
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Before writing this pattern for use with cotton yarns, I designed the Free Crochet Pattern – Half Double Crochet Hat Pattern  using a soft worsted weight (medium weight) yarn with wraps per inch of 10. The gauge for the yarn, using a 5.50 mm hook is: 14 stitches in 4 inches; 12 rows in 4 inches. The gauge for the cotton yarn though is different which is why I designed a hat pattern specifically to use with kitchen weight cotton yarn..

 

Half Double Crochet Cotton Hat Pattern Oombawka Design

Half Double Crochet Cotton Hat Pattern

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This pattern is designed to use with Bernat Handicrafter Cotton. This is a worsted weight (medium weight) yarn and it gives us 10 wraps per inch BUT the gauge for the yarn, using a 5.50 mm hook is: 12 stitches in 4 inches; 10 rows in 4 inches. 

If you are looking for a pattern to use with heavier Medium Weight Acrylic yarn like Red Heart with Love, or Red Heart Super Saver please try this free pattern:

Free Half Double Crochet Beanie Pattern

Mid-ear length half double crochet cotton hat pattern

This is a basic crochet hat pattern – this design uses worsted weight (medium weight) yarn – with wraps per inch of 10 (10 wpi). Similar weight yarn can be substituted (like Lily Sugar n’ Creme).

Please check your gauge as it is easy to allow your hdc stitches to become more relaxed as you crochet the repeat steps (rounds).

This hat is crocheted in continuous rounds/spirals – you do not need to slip stitch to join or chain-1. You can use a stitch marker (safety pin, bobby pin, bit of scrap yarn, twist tie, etc. ) to mark the first (or last) stitch of the round and move the stitch marker up each round as you progress, to mark your place.

There is no seam in this hat – it is neat and tidy.

If you prefer using the slip stitch to join and chain-1 (or 2) and working in regular rounds – you can – just try to keep those slip stitches small.  This will add a seam to the hat (from the slip stitch and chain stitches) and make the hat a little bit larger, but it will still work.

Supplies

Recommended Yarn: Bernat Handicrafter Cotton (DeLux) (Medium Weight Cotton Yarn) [4]
Hook: 5.50 mm (I)


Gauge: 12 stitches in 4 inches; 10 rows in 4 inches

Abbreviations

US Terminology used

beg – beginning
ch – chain
F/O – finish off and weave in your ends with an invisible join
hdc – half double crochet
MR – Magic Ring / Double Magic Ring (adjustable loop)
R – row/round
rem – remaining
rep – repeat
sc – single crochet
sk – skip
sl st – slip stitch
st/sts – stitch/stitches
x – times (repeat this many times)
* – Repeat the instructions between the asterisks the number of times indicated. This repeat will contain of multiple instructions.
() – Repeat the instructions between the parentheses the number of times indicated.
[] – at the end of the row – the total number of stitches

Helpful Tutorials

Adjustable Loop / Magic Ring Tutorial

Half Double Crochet abbreviated hdc

Yarn over the hook, insert your hook into the specified stitch, yarn over and pull up one loop. You have 3 loops on your hook. Yarn over and draw the yarn through all three loops on the hook to complete the stitch.

Extra Crochet Goodies

US Version

UK Version

Crochet Cheat Sheet

Crochet Translation Project – Crochet Terms in Swahili, Finnish, UK, US, Afrikaans, Portuguese, Russian, Polish, Italian, French, Spanish, Dutch and German

Helpful Video Tutorials

Beginner Crochet Stitches

Double Magic Ring – I have included this video at the end of the post for you 🙂 This is the MOST secure way to start our hats.

Invisible Join – I have included the video at the end of the post. When you click play it starts right at the spot where I demonstrate how to do the invisible join. It takes less than 1 minute to show you how to do this and it is the BEST way to finish off your hats.

Helpful Photo Tutorials

Double Magic Ring

Invisible Join

Back Bump of Chain

 Notes

  • When you see the x (for example 6x) this means to repeat the instructions in the brackets 6 times
  • this project is worked in rounds and you do not turn your work
  • do not slip stitch to join at the end of the rounds

Half Double Crochet Cotton Hat Pattern Instructions

Preemie (fits 12″ circumference, 4″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 6x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [30]
R5: 1 hdc in each st around [30]
R6-10: repeat R5 [30]
R11: 1 sl st (loosely) in each st around [30]

Newborn (fits 13.5″ circumference, 4.5″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 3x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around  [35]
R6: 1 hdc in each st around [35]
R7-12: repeat R6 [35]
R13: sl st (loosely) in each st around [35]

0-3 months (fits 16″ circumference, 5.25″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the 4 sts) 2x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [42]
R7: 1 hdc in each st around [42]
R8-13: repeat R7 [42]
R14: sl st (loosely) in each st around [42]

3-6 months (fits 17″ circumference, 5.5″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 5x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [45]
R7: 1 hdc in each st around [45]
R8-14: repeat R7 [45]
R15: sl st in each st around [45]

6-12 months (fits 18″ circumference, 5.75″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: 1 hdc in each st around [48]
R8-15 : repeat R7 [48]
R16: 1 sl st  (loosely) in each st around [48]

12-24 months (fits 19″ circumference, 6.25″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the  next 5 sts) 3x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [51]
R8: 1 hdc in each st around [51]
R9-16: repeat R8 [51]
R17: 1 sl st (loosely) in each st around [51]

3-5 years (fits 20″ circumference, 6.5″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) 6x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [54]
R8: 1 hdc in each st around [54]
R9-16: repeat R8 [54]
R17: 1 sl st (loosely) in each st around [54]

6-10 years (fits 21″ circumference, 7″ height)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 5 sts) 8x [56]
R8: 1 hdc in each st around [56]
R9-17: repeat R8 [56]
R18: 1 sl st (loosely) in each st around, F/O [56]

Adult Small (fits circumference 22″, height 7.25″)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 5 sts) 8x [56]
R8: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 6 sts) 4x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [60]
R9: 1 hdc in each st around [60]
R10-18: repeat R9 [60]
R19: 1 sl st (loosely) in each st around, F/O [60]

Medium (fits circumference 23″ height 7.5″)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 5 sts) 8x [56]
R8: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 6 sts) 7x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [63]
R9: 1 hdc in each st around [63]
R10-19: repeat R9 [63]
R20: 1 sl st in each st around, F/O [63]

Adult Large (fits circumference 24″, height 7.75″)

R1: 8 hdc in adjustable loop [8]
R2: 2 hdc in each st around [16]
R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 x [24]
R4: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 2 sts) 8x [32]
R5: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 3 sts) 8x  [40]
R6: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 4 sts) 8x [48]
R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 5 sts) 8x [56]
R8: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 6 sts) 8x [64]
R9: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 7sts) 2x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [66]
R10: 1 hdc in each st around [66]
R11-20: repeat R10 [66]
R21: 1 sl st in each st around, F/O [66]

Any questions or comments, please let me know!

I have tested the Preemie, Newborn, 0-3 months and Adult Medium sized hats in this pattern.

This video will show you how to do the invisible join method. It begins right at the spot in the video where I demonstrate the technique and takes less than one minute to watch.

 This is the video for the Double Magic Ring. This is by far the best way to begin any project you are working in the round. 

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70 Comments

  1. Hi Donna, there should be a small blip but where the stitches spiral and increase height slightly in the first round. That small step can be followed on the diagonal by one stitch to the right if you place the hat with the top of the hat facing downwards on a flat surface. When we work in spirals it offsets the stitch one to the right for every round. That might be too difficult though if this is one of your first projects so what I suggest is to check the hat height for the hat you are making (I wasn’t sure what size you were making?) and measure the hat from the middle at the top to the base. Then when you reach the right height, following the finishing instructions to complete the hat.

    All the best,
    Rhondda

  2. Help please! I forgot my stitch marker on the 13th round and I’m not sure where the round begins. I can see the spirals on the outside of the hat. Should I count my round complete following where the spiral begins round 2out to the round I’m on? Thanks for your help! This is my first hat pattern and I appreciate how there’s no seam. I think it’ll be better for donating chemo caps.

  3. Hi Mindy, I’m very sorry to hear about the loss of your brother. It is a wonderful way to honor him by making hats for those in need.

    To make the finishing less visible I have 2 quick tricks – one is to work the pattern up to the second last hdc, then in place of the last hdc, work 1 sc and then finish the hat with an invisible join. The invisible join will mimic the look of the other stitches and the staggered finish (using that sc) will decrease the slant from the last hdc to the first st of the round where you are joining.

    I’m not sure if I linked the invisible join tutorial in this post – here’s the link just in case: https://oombawkadesigncrochet.com/invisible-join-technique/

    Wishing you the very best,
    Rhondda

  4. I love this pattern! My aunt found this pattern when she started making hat donations, and now that I’m crocheting in honor of my brother who lost his fight last year, she’s shared this pattern with me. I love how you can make different-sized hats based on how big your head is.

    I recently made one as a gift for a friend who lives in the UK. Because it’s really cold there, I used two skeins of yarn simultaneously instead of just one to make the hat denser; he said that it feels very cozy and that it feels like his head is constantly getting a hug. (D’awww…)

    I have one question, though. When I finish a hat with the last round of hdc’s followed by the row of sl st’s, I end up with a bump at the end. Do you have any tips on how to make it a bit smoother so it looks straight?

  5. I love this pattern. It is perfect for what I needed as my first crochet hat. I am 4 or 5 rows from being finished with the beanie. I am using Lion Brand Comfy Cotton Blend (50% cotton/50% polyester) which is a light weight (3) yarn. Therefore, since it is working up at just under 3.75 stitches to the inch, I just kept following the increase progression until I got to a 21 inch circumference (10th row with 78 stiches) before switching to the consistent stich count rows. This hat will eventually be a costume wig with matching yarn beard for my husband as Merlin. Then I will be using this pattern for my wig for my costume as Mad Madam Mim. Thanks for publishing this pattern with a clear progression of sizes so that I could adapt for the yarn. 🙂

    Anna

  6. You are so welcome Charlotte 🙂 I love the hdc stitch too – it is my favorite of all the stitches because of how versatile it is! I’m happy you like the pattern and have been able to put it to such great use! Have a lovely week, Rhondda

  7. Rhonda, thanks so much for this comprehensive pattern. I am using it to make what I call hospice hats. These are donated for those individuals whose internal thermometer is out of whack and/or they suffer from the AC.

    I read all the other posts and do not think the versatility of this pattern has been addressed. The half double crochet stitch can be worked in the front two loops at the top of the prior round as shown in your pics, it can be worked in the back two loops of the stitch in the prior round to create a spiral ridge on the outside of the hat, or it can be worked in the back loop only to create a spiral chain on the outside of the hat. I just made a chemo hat by using your pattern, using the back two loops so I had a spiral ridge and then slip stitching eyelash yarn to each stitch of the spiral ridge, starting from the crown and following the ridge. Turned out beautifully! The ONLY change I make when using your pattern is in transitioning from the last row of hdc to the finishing slip stitch row, I add one single crochet to decrease the row height. I even change colors but make sure all color changes are in a row down the length of the hat so they can be worn in the back. Again, thank you!

  8. Hi Tae, No I do not slip stitch to join. I work in continuous spirals and do not join at the end of the rounds either. I use a stitch marker to mark my place. This makes the hat seamless 🙂 Hope this helps! Rhondda

  9. Hello I’m new to crocheting. Do you slip stich to complete the magic circle and then work Continually around ? The instruction abbreviations mention slip stich but i only see it in the edging at the end.

  10. Hi Lita, For the Adult Large: R9: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 7sts) 2x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [66]
    This means work 2 hdc in the first stitch, work 1 hdc in each of the next 7 stitches. 2x means to do this twice. Then work 1 hdc in each remaining stitch around. This round we are increasing by 2 stitches.

    so it would be 2 hdc in stitch 1, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc, 1 hdc. Then 2 hdc in the next one. Then 1 hdc in each for the rest of the round. The important part on the round is you need to add 2 extra stitches and space them a bit apart so the hat shape doesn’t have a ‘bump’ or spot that all the extra stitches are worked into (sometimes it leaves a small hole because we are squeezing 2 into 1 stitch).

    You could simply work 2 hdc in the first stitch and then work 1 hdc for 30 more stitches then 2 hdc in the next stitch and 1 in each remaining stitch 🙂

    Hope this helps, Rhondda

  11. Hi I am crocheting this hat adult large! Working up real fast! Have a question about round 9 so I do 3 2hdc in the first stitch and 7 hdc in the next 7 sts. And hdc till you reach 66 stitches? Thanks Lita

  12. Hi Elana, yes those yarns are very good for chemo caps too 🙂 I have a specific pattern written for Red Heart Soft Hats for Chemo Caps here: https://oombawkadesigncrochet.com/free-crochet-pattern-half-double/ Cotton is also an fantastic fabric to use because it is natural and breathable. This hat and yarn combination was specifically requested for this purpose so I created a this pattern which works with the cotton yarn. If you prefer to use Red Heart Soft please try the other pattern as this one will end up too small using that weight of yarn. I haven’t had a chance to try Premier Everyday Yarn so I’m not sure how it compares to be able to tell you which pattern will work the best to create a hat that will fit. I try to have different options for everyone as everyone has a different perception of what ‘soft’ is to them. All the best, Rhondda

  13. Chemo hats need to be soft yarn. As they can scratch the head and hurt. Try premier everyday yarn and red heart soft

  14. Hi Sharon, I’m happy your treatments helped so quickly!! It is kind of you to take the time to make hats for others who may need them after radiation treatments. I’m certain they will appreciate the kindness. For sizes smaller than child I used 1 ball of the yarn (Bernat Handicrafter Cotton Yarn). For child and teen I used 2 balls of yarn and I believe even adult medium was 2 balls of yarn. Adult large was more than 2 balls of yarn but only a little bit more. Each ball of bernat had 50 g / 1.75 oz, 73 meters / 80 yards so to be safe for adult large I would say you should have at least 150 g on hand (3 balls) and for adult medium 100 g on hand (160 yds) or 2 balls. Hope this helps! Rhondda

  15. How many skeins of say, sugar and cream yarn do I need for the adult medium and large caps? I have some of that at home but may need to buy other colors to have enough to make a cap. Either skein or yardage would help me figure what I would need. Didn’t see amounts listed. I am hoping to make several to donate by April. Had my own bout of cancer and robotic surgery last year, that resulted in exactly three radiation treatments so never lost hair. But still have to visit cancer doc every four months til August then go six months until five years have passed and see others who have lost hair. They are really thrilled to get cap donations so thought making the caps was something I could do for someone else. Did make a couple of soft bulky yarn but was looking for the Sugar and Cream cotton yarn as believe it would be more comfortable in the warmer months. Just need to know how much to buy for each cap.

  16. Hi Susan, it would be either your gauge or too many stitches. If the hat was larger than the size specified then you have either too many stitches or each stitch is larger than it should be based on the pattern gauge. The hats are based on maths so there is a certain number of stitches per inch. If you are even a half stitch less per inch it can make inches of difference by the end of the hat (hat will be too big). For example if you have a hat that has 60 stitches and the pattern says 3 stitches per inch – the finished hat will measure 20 inches circumference. If you crochet 2.5 sts per inch that same pattern will make the hat 24 inches circumference. If you have too many stitches per inch the hat will end up smaller. So what you need to check first is check to make sure you have the correct number of stitches. Next check to make sure you have the correct gauge by measuring your stitches per inch after the increase rounds (this means once you begin to work the same number of stitches for each round and aren’t adding any more than 1 stitch per stitch around). Check in a couple of places to make sure. If you have less than the stitches specified in the gauge in the pattern you are working your gauge loosely compared to me. This can happen if you are substituting a different weight of yarn (heavier) or if you crochet loosely (more relaxed) or even if you are using a slightly larger hook. If you are using the same yarn and hook as called for in the pattern then I recommend you go down a hook size to see if this will help you achieve the gauge. Let me know how this works – I know it can be tough at first with gauge – it is super important for hats so we really rely on math to make the pattern work to the right sizes. All the best, Rhondda

  17. Ok…I am a newbie to this. I made the medium-sized adult hat and it was huge and not at all shaped like the ones shown above. What in the world did I do? I am completely self taught and very basic. I would even be embarrassed to sent a picture of my “creation.” 🙁

  18. Hi Maria, I don’t yet but I could do some of those later in September – which hats did you need videos for and if I show the small size will that be enough for you to figure out the larger sizes too do you think? Thanks 🙂 Rhondda

  19. Hi , do you have video tutorials for chemo hats pattern. Sorry if its a big ask. Thanks.

  20. Thank you for the great patterns just when I needed them! Christmas will have new hats and scarves this year!😊

  21. For the newborn hat how many do you single chain for the adjustable loop? Sorry I am new to crocheting but it seems I should have to chain first in order to make the loop.

    Thank you

  22. Hi Carol 🙂 Here is the information you need: This hat is crocheted in continuous rounds/spirals – you do not need to slip stitch to join or chain-1. You can use a stitch marker (safety pin, bobby pin, bit of scrap yarn, twist tie, etc. ) to mark the first (or last) stitch of the round and move the stitch marker up each round as you progress, to mark your place.

    There is no seam in this hat – it is neat and tidy.

    If you prefer using the slip stitch to join and chain-1 (or 2) and working in regular rounds – you can – just try to keep those slip stitches small. This will add a seam to the hat (from the slip stitch and chain stitches) and make the hat a little bit larger, but it will still work.

    Hope this helps,
    Rhondda

  23. It varies from hat to hat. For anything larger than a child size I recommend 2 balls. Hope this helps! Rhondda

  24. Hi Carol 🙂 Actually there are only 66 stitches in R9.

    R9: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 7sts) 2x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [66]

    We are only repeating the (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in each of the next 7 sts) two times. Then we work 1 hdc in each remaining stitch around.

    I’m happy the hat turned out great!

    All the best,
    Rhondda

  25. I made the Adult Large size. Its came out great, but I wanted to let you know that there are actually 72 stitches not 66 in the last increasing round (round 9) and each subsequent round.

  26. Hi Brian, The pattern fits the head size it is created for if you meet gauge. Guage is specific to maths. So if you have 3 stitches per inch (as per the gauge for this design) and you crochet 63 stitches this means: 63 stitches multiplied by 3 stitches per inch = 21 inches hat size. The hat stretches 2 inches (which is the ‘negative ease’ in design terms) and will fit up to a 23″ head size. If you crochet the slip stitches at 3 stitches per inch too the hat still fits a 23″ head size. If you crochet tight stitches and make them less than 3 stitches per inch the hat will fit a smaller head size. Math is what the hat is based on so if you are meeting gauge the hat will definitely fit. If you have trouble crocheting the slip stitches to the specified gauge I recommend omitting them completely. If you are relatively new to crocheting they can sometimes be difficult to manage at the relaxed gauge specified. Also if you are new to crocheting I recommend checking your gauge in multiple places on the repeat rounds. There is a tendency for crocheters to either tighten up stitches on repeat rounds or loosen up stitches on repeat rounds. If you start making tighter stitches the rounds of the hat may become smaller and smaller as you progress through the hat. But I do guarantee you if you meet gauge on each round at 3 stitches per inch and you do indeed have the number of stitches indicated in the pattern the hat will be 21 inches in circumference when you are done. Math is pretty specific and it is why I love designing hats. If you reach gauge there is no ‘luck’ to making the hat fit the specified size. Math is a guarantee. Thanks and good luck! Rhondda.

  27. IMG_0116.JPG

    Not sure if the picture is viewable, because I am posting from my phone. This is the medium pattern that fits 23″. I used the same yarn, and same hook mentioned in the pattern. This is the first major pattern I’ve done, I’ve only done a couple of coasters and a dishrag up until now. I’m not sure this hat would fit anyone larger than an infant. After I added the slip stitches at the end, it no longer stretches at all. I actually started this pattern over and over again at least 5 times. This does not fill me with much confidence, and is very discouraging.

  28. Hi Danielle, As you are working the repeat round section it should begin to take shape and look like the hats in the photos. If it is just getting wider and wider and not shaping the same way then your gauge must not be quite right. You must be getting more than 3 stitches per inch if it is just increasing in size and not shaping. If you are getting 3 stitches per inch and you do have 63 stitches in your rounds then your finished hat will measure 21 inches around and stretch approximately 2 inches to fit up to a 23 inches head size. The pattern will work if your Gauge: 12 stitches in 4 inches; 10 rows in 4 inches. If you are substituting for a different yarn and hook you would need to reach the same gauge in order for the hat to fit. I hope this makes sense it isn’t just more confusing! What is the gauge you have reached? You should measure it during the repeat rounds section (not the rounds where you are increasing stitches) to get an accurate measurement. Hope this helps! Rhondda

  29. I’m attempting this pattern as a gift for Christmas. There does not yet seem to be any shape, seems to just get wider. I’m on row 13 of 20 for the medium 23 inch) hat. I’m new to this, so maybe I’m just reading the plattern wrong, or doing it incorrectly? I’m sorry I can’t post a picture.

  30. Very welcome Merry 🙂 I’m happy you tried the pattern! and yes a different yarn may have a different stitch height for the gauge – I am happy you were able to adjust the pattern to work with the yarn you chose 🙂 Have a lovely week, Rhondda

  31. Hi 🙂 You could chain 3 and slip stitch to join to form a loop and then work into the loop. Pull the yarn end to tighten the loop closed. Or, you could chain three and work the first Round directly into the 3rd ch from the hook.

    Either will work. They may cause a small hole at the top but you can easily stitch that closed when you have finished round 2. This will help keep the hat in the same size / shape.

    All the best,
    Rhondda

  32. Just made this hat for my son. He loves it. I used a different yarn so I ended up having to make many more rows to get the length I needed but it turned out great none the less. Thank you!

  33. For the 0-3 months if your not doing the loop or magic circle and you want to do the chain can you tell me how to start it?

  34. Hi Jackie, The pattern does not use the sl st to join and ch method for the end of rows; instead you are working in continuous rounds. This means when you reach the end of your round you will immediately begin the next round in the first (1st) stitch of the next round. Without any additional joining stitches or slip stitches. It removes the seam line up the back of the hat and gives the hat an overall clean and neat finish. You will need a stitch marker (safety pin or even a piece of yarn) to mark the first st of the round so you know when you get back to the beginning.

    The 1st st means the first st – I never realized it would be confusing – but I see why it could be now! because of the st st bit. I will make sure I write out ‘first’ from now on!! Thank you for mentioning this!!

    Your first stitch will always be your first stitch for every round of this pattern.

    When I crochet I always mark the first stitch with my stitch marker so I know where I need to start on the next round.

    I copied 3-5 years below so I can see if I can help with bits of it –

    R3: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next st) 8 x [24]

    When it reads (2 hdc in the first st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 times [24],

    this means you will work 2 hdc in the first st, in the next stitch you will work 1 hdc. You will repeat this (2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st) 8 times around the hat and you will have 24 stitches at the end of this round.

    So it would be (written out in full): (2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)(2 hdc in the next st, 1 hdc in the next st)

    You will have added 8 more stitches this round and now have 24 stitches in total.

    When you reach R7 we only need 54 sts in total to make the hat the right size for the head so since each stitch is a certain number of inches we must stop at 54 at our current gauge in order for the hat to fit. This is why reaching the gauge in the pattern is so important. If you have a bigger gauge (more stitches per inch than is written in the pattern) you will have a smaller hat. If you have a smaller gauge (so less stitches per inch) you will have a bigger hat – neither of which will fit the head this size was written for. I hope this makes sense 🙂

    So for this hat we need 54 sts at 3 sts per inch to fit a 3-5 year old’s head (normally 20″ circumference head) and since we need to make the hat fit it needs to actually be smaller than the head – so we are making the hat 18″ in circumference (it stretches 2 inches).

    54 divided by 3 sts per inch is 18 inches.

    That is the maths behind it 😉 anyway the reason I wanted to show you R7 is because I only ask you to repeat the instructions in the first parenthesis 6 times.

    This means you will work R7 like this: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts)
    (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) and then work 1 hdc in each of the remaining 12 sts to the end. This round increases only 6 stitches to make 54 in total.

    R7: (2 hdc in 1st st, 1 hdc in next 5 sts) 6x, 1 hdc in each remaining st around [54]

    Also if you are newer to crochet you may wish to substitute the final slip stitch round for a single crochet round – the sl sts need to be worked loosely so they do not make the hat too snug – so I recommend omitting the final round completely, or working sc instead if you are newer at reaching a looser tension.

    I hope this helped 🙂
    Let me know if you have any other questions,
    All the best,
    Rhondda

  35. Hi Sonja, If you are using the Cotton I would recommend having 3 balls of the Bernat Handicrafter on hand in your color lot for the adult large. I know I used 2 for the Adult Medium – I am not 100% sure if you will need the 3rd ball but it would be better safe than sorry. The yarn comes 50 g balls of 73 m each. Hope this helps. Rhondda

  36. I am new to crocheting and have made four hats, but they all used the slip stitch and chain. I am not clear on the the meaning of 2 hdc in 1st st, I get the 2 half double crochets in 1st stitch, but not the second abbreviation of stitch. I am also not beginning and ending in the same stitches. Please tell me what I am doing wrong.
    Thank you,
    Jackie

  37. I don’t see a recommendation for the amount of yarn to purchase. I am planning to make the adult large.

  38. Thank you for the lovely pattern with the great sizes. My daughters head has a circumference of 26″. she has really thick hair. anyway I was wondering if you could suggest how I would increase this pattern to fit her head.

  39. Hi Rhondda! Love this pattern! What are the colors of the Bernat delux yarn that you used in the photo for this tutorial? I love all of them! The front one looks like seaspray but not sure of the other 2. Such beautiful colors. Thanks!

  40. I’m so happy you find the patterns and tutorials helpful Liz! Have fun with your yarn 🙂 All the best, Rhondda

  41. You are such a inspiration for me. I am a self thought crochet lover from Norway and i am so happy to have found your blog and other social media sites! Thanks a lot for great patterns and tutorials! I am getting better for every pattern or stitch you teach me 🙂

  42. Hi I was going to ask you a question about the pattern But i read the other posts and my question has been answered Thanks Bronwyn

  43. Hi Cheri 🙂 You are very welcome!

    I like working in spirals for hats when they are sc or hdc – for dc hats I find I need the extra chain stitches to bring the height of the current round up to the height of the next round – there is just too much of a difference in row heights and if you continue in a spiral I find it gives a bit of a hole in the hat where the rows meet.

    My basic rule of thumb – when designing or crocheting hats for myself 😉 – is spirals for sc and hdc stitches (or stitches of similar heights) and for any taller stitches working in rounds with a sl st to join and chain stitches to build up the height of the round.

    Another reason I tend to pick the dreaded sl st join and working in rounds over the spirals (which is my favourite) is when there is a colour change – it is the simplest way to make sure the colour sections line up to the same height. You can make it work with spirals – but it takes a little extra work to get it right.

    It is really a personal preference I think – and a mindset – I find older patterns follow the rule of rounds more often than more recently written patterns – even for amigurumi like toys. Some patterns I have come across from the 70’s and 80’s even have toys worked in rounds – whereas now it is almost unheard of to see an amigurumi in anything other than spirals and sc stitches.

    Hope this helps a bit!

    I do have a few variations of patterns for hdc hats using different types of yarn – this one is best for cotton worsted weight yarn 🙂

    All the best,
    Rhondda

  44. Hi Rhondda. First I would like to thank you for this pattern. I am expecting a new grandchild in November and decided I must find a hat pattern I can work with. The best part for me is that this is in the spiral with no joining, therefore no seams!!

    I crochet in the flat and some rounds very well but still have difficulties with joining properly and having it look as neat as I would like. Is there any reason this same pattern (no joins or seams) couldn’t be converted to use with another stitch – sc, dc, v-stitch, etc?? I have perused and attempted many patterns and still don’t fully understand why some work in the round must be joined and with some it isn’t necessary.

    Thanks so much for taking the time to read this as well as write out these lovely patterns to share.

    Cheri

  45. You are very welcome Sue 🙂 I’m happy the pattern was easy to follow. I have to admit I have issue with ads within the ‘words’ of my posts – it is tempting financially to add them but I find I always click on them on other people’s posts because I think they are links to more information related to the pattern – and I must admit it drives me slightly crazy! I try to make sure all of my ads are clearly indicated on my sidebars – since I do need them to help pay for the costs of the website 🙂 Hopefully doing it this way keeps the site nice and clean and tidy! If you run into any questions about my patterns, please feel free to send me a message 🙂 I am very happy to help!! Have a lovely week, Rhondda

  46. Rhondda, I am so impressed with the way you have presented your pattern. The very clear instructions, and informative information on the yarn differences, and ad free pattern was a joy to see. The ads and additional sites that followed were easier to see. Your pattern and all the sizes it included were wonderful. I loved that you shared it for free, on an old lady’s ( haha) budget it helps. I will be crocheting a number of your hats. Thank you so much for your skills. Your wonderful personality really comes through on This site.
    Sue LaPaglia

  47. I have no clue what crochet hooks are in mm? What is the letter for the 5.50 mm hook used in your half double crochet hat. I’m making a few for my son-in-law who was just diagnosed with terminal lung & lymph node cancer.
    Thanks,
    Jayne

  48. Hi Mary Ann, You can begin using the chain 3 and slip stitch to join to form a loop if you want 🙂 I usually use an adjustable loop technique (magic loop, magic ring, adjustable ring). Hope this helps, Rhondda

  49. Love this pattern and the look …I’m unsure as to how you start out? It starts out with row 1…8 hdc in adjustable loop..how many chains to get the loop? I’m used to starting out with chaing 4 or 5 and joining with a slip stitch. How does the pattern start?

  50. Hi Carolee,

    Yarn descriptions can be very difficult to grasp. The wraps per inch information isn't included on yarn labels (unfortunately!) – but you can check it yourself quite easily. I must admit sometimes I even bring a pencil with me to the yarn store with a one inch section marked off on it (I just create two black marker lines to show a one inch measurement) – then I take the yarn end from the ball on the shelf and wrap it around the pencil to see how many times it wraps around to get my wraps per inch.

    There are some great videos and instructions on how to find the information. If you are interested just let me know and I will respond with the links.

    For the purchasing of yarn quantities – there are some mathematical equations you can use to determine what you will likely need – but I don't do this – I usually check the recommended amount listed by the Designer (so for the ball of yarn they recommend I check the length included in that ball on the label – usually online) then when I substitute I get the same amount based on the length of the substituted yarn, plus one extra ball (just in case – in the same dye lot) and when I complete the project I return the extra ball if I didn't need it. Hope this helps a bit!!

    Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment 🙂 Rhondda

  51. Thank you for the wpi info. I've been crocheting for about two years and feel like I have a good grasp on following patterns and learning new stitches, but I am still easily confused with yarn descriptions. I've never notice the wpi info, now I will know to check the labels. One thing that continually gets me is quantity of yarn for a larger project. Many patterns call for "balls" of yarn, but each brand comes in many different lengths. Do you have a quick solution to this little problem? btw – love your patterns!