Crochet Tip: 4 Ways to Change Your Yarn

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Changing to another ball of yarn, or another color of yarn, can be done in many different ways. Here are 4 ways to change your yarn or, to add a different color of yarn to you work in progress (WIP).

4 Ways to Change Your Yarn Post Cover Changing to another ball of yarn, or another color of yarn, can be done in many different ways. Here are 4 ways to change your yarn or, to add a different color of yarn to you work in progress (WIP).

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4 Ways to Change Your Yarn

  1. Last Yarn Over Method
  2. Russian Join Method
  3. Standing Stitches Method
  4. Fisherman’s Knot Method

YouTube Video 4 Ways to Change Your Yarn

Photo tutorial included below.

Last Yarn Over Method

Changing your yarn on the last yarn over of a stitch is very easy to do!

This color changing method has the benefit of allowing you to change your yarn color at any point in your project, and it creates a seamless color change. 

I have included a photo tutorial beneath the written explanation.

Changing to the Same Color of Yarn

If you are changing balls of the same color of yarn, crochet until you have at least 6-inches of yarn remaining (you will need to weave in this end later to secure it properly). When you are crocheting your last stitch, work your stitch until the last yarn over. Then, instead of using the old yarn that is on your hook to make that last yarn over, yarn over with a strand of yarn from the new ball of yarn (leaving a 6 inch tail of yarn to weave in later). Continue crocheting your project using the new stand of yarn.  You can work over the other tail of yarn as you crochet, or weave it in at the end of your project.

Changing to a New Color of Yarn

If you are changing balls of yarn and you are going to be using a NEW color, you will need to apply the above method on the stitch before the new color begins. Complete the stitch before you are supposed to use the new color, up to the last yarn over of that stitch. Then use the new color of yarn to do that last yarn over.

This is the method I use whenever I am changing my yarn colors.

Last Yarn Over Step 1
Last Yarn Over Step 2
Last Yarn Over Step 3
Last Yarn Over Step 4

Russian Join

The Russian Join method of changing yarn colors is worked like this:

Step 1: Thread a few inches of your working yarn end through a small yarn needle. Thread the needle back through the same yarn end (leaving a small loop open at the end by the eye of the needle) and pull the tail of yarn through all the plies.

Russian Join Step 1

Step 2: With your second ball of yarn, thread your yarn end through the small yarn needle and insert the needle through the loop you left open in your working yarn.

Russian Join Step 2

Step 3: Repeat step 1 with your second strand of yarn. You now have 2 interlocking loops of yarn.

Russian Join Step 3

Step 4: Pull the yarn tails from both strands of yarn to tighten and close the 2 loops of yarn. 

Russian Join Step 4

Step 5: Shows the strands tightened to close the small loops left where the yarns join.

Russian Join Step 5

Trim the yarn tails, or work over them as you continue to crochet to secure them.

Standing Stitches

This is my favorite method of joining a new color of yarn at the beginning of a row, or round.

There are a couple different ways to do this too. One way is by beginning the stitch as though you were already crocheting with your yarn (pretending that you are just continuing even though your yarn is not yet attached to the project).

You would yarn over once to begin (to replace that loop that is normally already on your hook) and then you would yarn over as normal for whatever stitch you are making. You just hold those yarn overs in place on your hook with your finger and insert the hook into the work and complete the stitch.

This method can be a bit tricky because you need to hold the extra yarn over in place, without allowing it twist and fall off the hook before you crochet it. Watch where I place my finger to hold the strand of yarn while I make the stitch. The strand has a tendency to slide so be sure you have hold of it!  If you are having trouble, proceed to Method 2. Method 2 is how I begin my standing stitches.

Method 1
Standing Stitches Method 1 Step 1
Standing Stitches Method 1 Step 2
Standing Stitches Method 1 Step 3
Standing Stitches Method 1 Step 4
Standing Stitches Method 1 Step 5
Method 2

The method I use to make my standing stitch is exactly the same, except instead of beginning with an extra yarn over to replace the loop on my hook I begin with a slip knot on my hook.  I then crochet the stitch I need to make as normal.

Fisherman’s Knot

This is my preferred way to join, mid-row, if I am using the same color of yarn for my next stitch. It does create a small knot but I find it is a very secure knot and tiny enough that I don’t seem to notice it with medium weight yarns.

How to Make a Fisherman’s Knot

Step 1: Place 2 strands of yarn side by side.

Fisherman's Knot Step 1

Step 2: Tie a loose overhand knot with your working yarn end, over the new yarn strand (about 4 inches away from the end).

Fisherman's Knot Step 2

Step 3: Tie a loose overhand knot with your new yarn end, around the working yarn strand (about 4 inches away from the end).

Fisherman's Knot Step 3

Step 4: Pull both yarn strands in opposite directions to slide the two knots together to secure the join.

Fisherman's Knot Step 4

Step 5: Your Fisherman’s Knot is tied.

Fisherman's Knot Step 5

Crochet over the ends to secure them in place. 

Weave them in at the end of your project to secure them completely.

If you enjoyed learning these 4 Ways to Change Your Yarn, then you may also enjoy these Crochet Tips

Changing to another ball of yarn, or another color of yarn, can be done in many different ways. Here are 4 ways to change your yarn or, to add a different color of yarn to you work in progress (WIP).
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2 Comments

  1. Thank you so much. I’m a newbie/beginner to crochet so really appreciate the tutorials, tips & free patterns you generously give to us & I’m also now subscribed to your blog Karen