Corner-to-corner Shell Stitch

When you purchase through links on my site, I may earn an affiliate commission. Here’s how it works.

corner to corner stitch

Please note, this tutorial will take a few moments to load as it has many pictures to help you master this stitch- thank you for your patience!

This is the Right Handed Version of the Corner-to-Corner Shell Stitch.

This tutorial will produce 4″ x 4″ square – the perfect size for a coaster.

Corner to Corner
Make a 4×4 or 8×8 Square

If you wish to make a 8″ x 8″ square instead – continue to increase shell groups until you have 9 sets of shell groups in height – then begin to decrease on both sides of your project  (as shown beginning in Step 31).

If you wish to make an Afghan – you would continue to increase shell groups until you have reached a desired length; then begin to decrease. To make a square, you need to make decreases on both sides. To make a rectangle you need to make decreases on one side only (for example – decrease length but continue to add extra shell groups on width).

I hope you find this tutorial helpful – the left-handed version is available here: C2C Shell Stitch – Left Handed Version

How to find the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts

C2C
This is the space you need to sl st into – the one created by the 2 skipped ch sts

Corner to Corner Coaster Pattern & Tutorial

Yarn: Red Heart with Love
Hook: 6.0 mm (J)

Add this to Queue and Favorites

1 Corner to Corner R
Step 1 | Step 2

Step 1: ch 5

Step 2: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook, 1 dc in each of the next 2 ch sts  (*the first shell group*)

2 Corner to Corner R
Step 3 | Step 4

Step 3: ch 5

Step 4: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook, 1 dc in each of the next 2 ch sts

Step 5 | Step 6

Step 5: flip the *first shell group* to allow you to work into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts in Step 2 [Line up the green dots shown in the image for Step 4]

Step 6: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts in the *first shell group*

corner to corner
Step 7 | Step 8

Step 7: ch 2

Step 8: 3 dc into the same sp

corner to corner
Step 9 | Step 10

Step 9: ch 5

Step 10: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook, 1 dc in each of the next 2 ch sts

Corner to Corner
Step 11 | Step 12

Step 11: flip your work so it looks like mine in the above image.

Step 12: flip the end up to align the green dots – to allow you to work into the skipped 2 ch sts

Corner to Corner
Step 13 | Step 14

Step 13: this is your work flipped into the correct position

Step 14: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts in the next shell group

Corner to Corner
Step 15 | Step 16

Step 15: ch 2

Step 16: 3 dc into the same sp

Corner to Corner
Step 17 | Step 18

Step 17: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Step 18: ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 19 | Step 20

Step 19: 3 dc into the same sp

Step 20: ch 5

Corner to Corner
Step 21 | Step 22

Step 21: 1 dc in the 3rd ch from the hook, 1 dc in each of the next 2 ch sts

Step 22: flip your work to align the green dots (see image in Step 21)

Corner to Corner
Step 23 | Step 24

Step 23: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Step 24: ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 25 | Step 26

Step 25: 3 dc into the same sp

Step 26: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Corner to Corner
Step 27 | Step 28

Step 27: ch 2

Step 28: 3 dc into the same sp

Corner to Corner
Step 29 | Step 30

Step 29:  1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group, ch 2

Step 30: 3 dc into the same sp

Note: We are now beginning to decrease. If you want to make an 8×8 square instead of the 4×4 size coaster you will need to continue increasing shell groups – see steps 20-22 – and continue to add increases to both ends of your diagonal rows until you have 9 sets of shell groups [for the 8×8 Afghan Square] for the length of your piece. Then you will begin decreasing as shown in Steps 31-35. To make an Afghan you will need to continue increasing shell groups until your project has reached the desired length and then decrease (decreases on both sides will make a square piece ; decrease on one side only to make a rectangle) until you have formed the square or rectangle shape.

Corner to Corner
Step 31 | Step 32

Step 31: ch 1, turn, 1 sl st into each of the next 3 dc sts,

Step 32: 1 sl st around the ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 33 | Step 34

Step 33: ch 2

Step 34: 3 dc into the same sp

Corner to Corner
Step 35 | Step 36

Step 35: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Step 36: ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 37 | Step 38

Step 37: 3 dc into the same sp

Step 38: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Corner to Corner
Step 39 | Step 40

Step 39: ch 2, 3 dc into the same sp

Step 40: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Corner to Corner
Step 41 | Step 42

Step 41: ch 1, turn, 1 sl st into each of the next 3 dc sts

Step 42: 1 sl st around the ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 43 | Step 44

Step 43: ch 2

Step 44: 3 dc into the same sp

Corner to Corner
Step 45 | Step 46

Step 45: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Step 46: ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 47 | Step 48

Step 47: 3 dc into the same sp

Step 48: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Corner to Corner
Step 49 | Step 50

Step 49: turn, ch 1

Step 50: 1 sl st into each of the next 3 dc sts

Corner to Corner
Step 51 | Step 52

Step 51: 1 sl st around the ch 2

Step 52: ch 2

Corner to Corner
Step 53 | Step 54

Step 53: 3 dc into the same sp

Step 54: 1 sl st into the space created by the 2 skipped ch sts of the next shell group

Corner to Corner
Step 55

Step 55: sc evenly around the outside of the square to finish

 

Signature

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

38 Comments

  1. Is it possible to purchase this pattern without all the ads? It will not print completely. Thanks

  2. This looks a lot like the normal c2c stitch but I’m eager to try it. Thank you so much for making a print version! I have neck problems and trying to crochet and read the pattern on a screen is very difficult and uncomfortable. Being able to pick it up, read the instructions, study the photos and then work the pattern is a relief.

    I’m off to see the rest of your site.

  3. Rhondda,
    Thank-you so much! I like the way this stitch works up and wanted to find the designer. After finding many patterns using this stitch ,identifying the designer, I realized the creator of the stitch is not identified.
    This raises my appreciation for designer’s’ which was pretty high to begin with. I found that the chain at the beginning of the row caused a bump on the edge, so I used only 2 chains there.

  4. Hi Patricia 🙂 Stitches, like letters in the alphabet cannot be ‘copyrighted’ because they are a building block upon which a pattern (or word) is created. That being said, the way a stitch is presented and the pattern written to present it can be copyrighted. If you use this stitch to create something different – so a scarf, or wrap, etc. the pattern you write becomes yours – but you do not ‘own’ the stitch itself. It is the finished written pattern which is copyrighted and how you present it – your format or style and how you ‘string’ the words together. You would need to write it in your own words and use your own images for your specific finished pattern/design. Does this make sense? It can be hard to explain…Many stitches / stitch patterns can be found in stitch pattern dictionaries and I actually contacted a number of publishers to make sure I was ‘ok’ to create patterns (i.e. blocks or dishcloths or garments) using the stitch – and I was advised as long as I do not copy word-for-word the written instructions in the publication I can apply the stitch to whichever design I make and it is allowable 🙂 This applies to ‘stitches’ though – not published patterns – so resizing a published design like a top, or sweater, does not count as a new design because you are using the original maths to create a different size of the same thing 🙂 Hope this helps! PS you likely will see this same stitch in many places and books – I chose to use only a ch 2 (if I am remembering correctly) because the yarn I was using was making the ch 3 buckle a bit – so if you do try this in a different yarn you might want to increase to a ch 3 if it seems a bit ‘tight’. All the best, Rhondda

  5. I’ve been crocheting for years and when someone asks for something easy, the corner-to-corner always come up. I wanted to try it because of the diagonal stripes. I needed it to be a lapghan. I wasn’t sure how the piece would finish once I created the third corner and it came out perfectly. I love the texture
    I tried to link the pattern to a designer. I see this pattern is ‘by’ the person who has created a color scheme or as you, Rhondda, did with the tutorial. So how does it work when a stitch is created. I haven’t noticed a stitch attributed to a designer.

  6. This is one of my favorite stitch patterns but I’ve struggled with other sets of directions. This is by far the best directions I’ve ever used! Thanks for the pictures—they help a lot. I’ll be referring to this whenever I want to use this pattern.

    Maymie

  7. Thanks a lot for this wonderful photo tutorial!
    I tried and tried to learn the corner to corner stitch but I only completed the first 6 blocks, then I didn’t know how to proceed!

    Your photos are quite clear and I will give it a new try!

    Thanks!

  8. Thanks for such an easy to follow tutorial. I’ve been intimated thinking I would fail but not anymore!

  9. Is there a way to print this pattern as the print friendly option says it doesn’t have access to the page? I would like to try this pattern but don’t have my computer nearby when I’m crocheting. Thanks for suggestions, Carole

  10. This was the very first thing I was taught to make so many years ago. It is fast and easy. I had forgotten how to make it. I am very blessed to come across these directions. Now I can teach my girls how to do it. Thanks!!

  11. Nice and easy! Many thanks for the photos and the green dots. Made it very easy to get the hang of it.

  12. Hi Mary 🙂 You are very welcome! Let me know if you have any questions with the tutorial when you get time to try it! All the best,
    Rhondda

  13. Rhondda, great tutorial….I see a blankie in my future. Added to #2 spot on to-do list 🙂
    Thank you!

  14. Oh darn! I wonder if there is something I can make better in the tutorial – where do you think you get stuck?

  15. not addictive for everybody, Rhondda. Tried before and right now again – don’t understand, sorry. I alwas end up with strange looking pieces, which have too many corners or are somehow funnyshaped. Maybe in a future life? Thanks for all your efforts!

  16. Thank you Diana 🙂 I’m happy you like the tutorial and photos! and you are most welcome,

    Have a lovely week,
    Rhondda

  17. Great look! I have it in my Ravelry favs and library. Now on my ‘have to try’ list too! Thanks, Rhondda

  18. Love your work! I look so forward to your newsletter.
    Your instructions & photo’s are very clear. Great eye for detail!
    We use to call this a box stitch & the afghan a diagonal stripe. Corner to corner immediately brings to mind what this pattern looks like, the texture is amazing.
    Thanks for all your hard work.

  19. Thanks Lauri 🙂 I was happy the photos turned out – I was sitting out on the back porch trying my best to get good lighting for each and every step! If you want me to link to your tutorial too 🙂 just send me the link ok? I don’t mind! Rhondda

  20. Much better pictures than my old tutorial (on ravelry). I’ve been meaning to update all my photos and the steps, but never got around to it. You’ve got nice clear photos for each step along with all the hints and arrows that are needed. I applaud your effort! 🙂 Lauri

  21. Hi Chelsea 🙂 Yes there is:

    To make a rectangle you need to make decreases on one side only (for example – decrease length but continue to add extra shell groups on width).

    So you only decrease on one side of the diagonal until your pieces measures the dimensions you want 🙂

  22. Is there a way to make this into a rectangular shape? I was thinking of just doing one large, rectangular version for an afghan. Is this possible?
    Thanks for the tutorial, by the way. I am always looking for new stitches to learn! 😀

  23. awesome looking stitch pattern! I can’t wait to test the left-handed version 🙂

  24. Hi Sharon 🙂 Thank you! It is a very addictive stitch!! I think I might want to make a full blanket with it! Hugs! Rhondda

  25. Thanks Mary Ellen!! I am happy it was easy to follow 🙂 Thank you so much for letting me know 🙂 Rhondda

  26. thanks for the great tut I just made a practice coaster very easy to follow

  27. This is great Rhondda, I have never even tried the C2Cbefore very anxious to give it a whirl!

    Thank you!

    Hugs,

    Sharon